Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Infection Sites as Precursor for Serious Health Problems

Author's: Muhammad Naeem Iqbal1,2*, Asfa Ashraf2,3
Authors' Affiliations
1The School of Life Sciences, Fujian Agriculture and Forestry University, Fuzhou 350002, China.2Pakistan Science Mission (PSM), Narowal (Noor Kot 51770), Pakistan.3The School of Life Sciences, Fujian Normal University, Fuzhou 350117, China.*CorrespondenceMuhammad Naeem Iqbal, PSM Editorial Office, Pakistan Science Mission (PSM), Narowal (Noor Kot 51770), Pakistan.Email:driqbalnaeem@hotmail.com
Article Type: Perspective     Published: Mar. 31, 2021 Pages: 29-31
DOI:        Views 314       Downloads 0

Abstract

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is a major human pathogen that causes severe morbidity and mortality worldwide. MRSA has the ability to acquire resistance to most antibiotics, augmented by constant emergence of new clones, making S. aureus a “superbug.” The new clones can invade community settings and infect people without predisposing risk factors. S. aureus is one of the major causes of hospital and community-acquired infections, resulting in serious consequences. In this issue, Al-Khawlany et al. (2021) report the overall prevalence rate of MRSA infection was 9.3% isolated from the nose and infected sites. All MRSA isolates were sensitive to vancomycin and resistant to oxacillin. The incidence of MRSA infections in the community setting has been growing consistently. MRSA colonization is an important risk factor for the development of infection serving as a precursor for serious health problems. In addition, resistance to the many current antibiotics used to treat these infections is also growing, further complicating management. Basic infection control practices are integral to the prevention and control of hospital-associated MRSA along with proper drug therapy.

Keywords

Methicillin-resistant bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus, Tissue Infections, Health problems.

How to cite

Iqbal, M.N., Ashraf, A., 2021. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus from Infection Sites as Precursor for Serious Health Problems. PSM Microbiol., 6(1): 29-31.